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2. HOW I BEGAN LIFE :








AN AUTOBIOGRAPHY:
THE STORY OF MY EXPERIMENTS WITH TRUTH
by Mohandas K. Gandhi


Part -2.



My elder brother had built high hopes on me. The desire for wealth and name and fame was
great in him. He had a big heart, generous to a fault. This, combined with his simple nature, had
attracted to him many friends, and through them he expected to get me briefs. He had also
assumed that I should have a swinging practice and had, in that expectation, allowed the
household expenses to become top-heavy. He had also left no stone unturned in preparing the
field for my practice.



my return, and to that end crockery and other such things, which used to be kept in the house
only for special occasions, were now in general use. My 'reforms' put the finishing touch. I
introduced oatmeal porridge, and cocoa was to replace tea and coffee. But in truth it became an
addition to tea and coffee. Boots and shoes were already there. I completed the Europeanization
by adding the European dress.


Expenses thus went up. New things were added every day. We had succeeded in tying a white
elephant at our door. But how was the wherewithal to be found? To start practice in Rajkot would
have meant sure ridicule. I had hardly the knowledge of a qualified vakil, and yet I expected to be
paid ten times his fee! No client would be fool enough to engage me. And even if such a one was
to be found, should I add arrogance and fraud to my ignorance, and increase the burden of debt I
owed to the world?


Friends advised me to go to Bombay for some time in order to gain experience of the High
Court, to study Indian law, and to try to get what briefs I could. I took up the suggestion, and went.
In Bombay I started a household with a cook as incompetent as myself. He was a Brahman. I
did not treat him as a servant, but as a member of the household. He would pour water over
himself but never wash. Hisdhoti was dirty, as also his sacred thread, and he was completely
innocent of the scriptures. But how was I to get a better cook?


'Well, Ravishankar' (for that was his name), I would ask him, 'you may not know cooking, but
surely you must know your sandhya (daily worship) ,etc.'


'Sandhya, sir! The plough is our sandhya, and the spade our daily ritual. That is the type of
Brahman I am. I must live on your mercy. Otherwise agriculture is of course there for me.'
So I had to be Ravishankar's teacher. Time I had enough. I began to do half the cooking
myself, and introduced the English experiments in vegetarian cookery. I invested in a stove, and
with Ravishankar began to run the kitchen. I had no scruples about interdining, Ravishankar too
came to have none, and so we went on merrily together. There was only one obstacle.
Ravishankar had sworn to remain dirty and to keep the food unclean!


But it was impossible for me to get along in Bombay for more than four or five months, there
being no income to square with the ever-increasing expenditure.


This was how I began life. I found the barrister's profession a bad job--much show and little
knowledge. IThe storm in my caste over my foreign voyage was still brewing. It had divided the caste into
two camps, one of which immediately readmitted me, while the other was bent on keeping me
out. To please the former my brother took me to Nasik before going to Rajkot, gave me a bath in
the sacred river, and on reaching Rajkot gave a caste dinner. I did not like all this. But my
brother's love for me was boundless, and my devotion to him was in proportion to it, and so I
mechanically acted as he wished, taking his will to be law. The trouble about readmission to the
caste was thus practically over.



I never tried to seek admission to the section that had refused it. Nor did I feel even mental
resentment against any of the headmen of that section. Some of these regarded me with dislike,
but I scrupulously avoided hurting their feelings. I fully respected the caste regulations about
excommunication. According to these, none of my relations, including my father-in-law and
mother-in-law, and even my sister and brother-in-law, could entertain me; and I would not so
much as drink water at their houses. They were prepared secretly to evade the prohibition, but it
went against the grain with me to do a thing in secret that I would not do in public.



The result of my scrupulous conduct was that I never had occasion to be troubled by the caste;
nay, I have experienced nothing but affection and generosity from the general body of the section
that still regards me as excommunicated. They have even helped me in my work, without ever
expecting me to do anything for the caste. It is my conviction that all these good things are due to
my non-resistance. Had I agitated for being admitted to the caste, had I attempted to divide it into
more camps, had I provoked the caste-men, they would surely have retaliated; and instead of
steering clear of the storm, I should, on arrival from England, have found myself in a whirlpool of
agitation, and perhaps a party to dissimulation.



My relations with my wife were still not as I desired. Even my stay in England had not cured me
of jealously. I continued my squeamishness and suspiciousness in respect of every little thing,
and hence all my cherished desires remained unfulfilled. I had decided that my wife should learn
reading and writing, and that I should help her in her studies, but my lust came in the way and
she had to suffer for my own shortcoming. Once I went [to] the length of sending her away to her
father's house, and consented to receive her back only after I had made her thoroughly
miserable. I saw later that all this was pure folly on my part.



I had planned reform in the education of children. My brother had children, and my own child
which I had left at home when I went to England was now a boy of nearly four. It was my desire to
teach these little ones physical exercise and make them hardy, and also to give them the benefit
of my personal guidance. In this I had my brother's support, and I succeeded in my efforts more
or less. I very much liked the company of children, and the habit of playing and joking with them
has stayed with me till today. I have ever since thought that I should make a good teacher of
children.



The necessity for food 'reform' was obvious. Tea and coffee had already found their place in
the house. My brother had thought it fit to keep some sort of English atmosphere ready for me on
my return, and to that end crockery and other such things, which used to be kept in the house
only for special occasions, were now in general use. My 'reforms' put the finishing touch. I
introduced oatmeal porridge, and cocoa was to replace tea and coffee. But in truth it became an
addition to tea and coffee. Boots and shoes were already there. I completed the Europeanization
by adding the European dress.



Expenses thus went up. New things were added every day. We had succeeded in tying a white
elephant at our door. But how was the wherewithal to be found? To start practice in Rajkot would
have meant sure ridicule. I had hardly the knowledge of a qualified vakil, and yet I expected to be
paid ten times his fee! No client would be fool enough to engage me. And even if such a one was
to be found, should I add arrogance and fraud to my ignorance, and increase the burden of debt I
owed to the world?



Friends advised me to go to Bombay for some time in order to gain experience of the High
Court, to study Indian law, and to try to get what briefs I could. I took up the suggestion, and went.
In Bombay I started a household with a cook as incompetent as myself. He was a Brahman. I
did not treat him as a servant, but as a member of the household. He would pour water over
himself but never wash. Hisdhoti was dirty, as also his sacred thread, and he was completely
innocent of the scriptures. But how was I to get a better cook?


'Well, Ravishankar' (for that was his name), I would ask him, 'you may not know cooking, but
surely you must know your sandhya (daily worship) ,etc.'


'Sandhya, sir! The plough is our sandhya, and the spade our daily ritual. That is the type of
Brahman I am. I must live on your mercy. Otherwise agriculture is of course there for me.'



So I had to be Ravishankar's teacher. Time I had enough. I began to do half the cooking
myself, and introduced the English experiments in vegetarian cookery. I invested in a stove, and
with Ravishankar began to run the kitchen. I had no scruples about interdining, Ravishankar too
came to have none, and so we went on merrily together. There was only one obstacle.
Ravishankar had sworn to remain dirty and to keep the food unclean!


But it was impossible for me to get along in Bombay for more than four or five months, there
being no income to square with the ever-increasing expenditure.


This was how I began life. I found the barrister's profession a bad job--much show and little
knowledge. I felt a crushing sense of my responsibility.

Next : 3. THE FIRST CASE

Continues...
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